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Update for Buffalo and Erie County

WELCOME TO THE WORLD CAPITAL OF WINGS

We didn’t just invent one of America’s favorite foods in Buffalo. We perfected the Buffalo wing over the last six decades using special sauces, secret family recipes passed down through the generations and preparation methods found nowhere else in the world. The history and character at the 14 neighborhood pubs and tucked-away corner taverns along the Buffalo Wing Trail are as unique and distinct as the wings they serve. So pull up a chair and join us in the World Capital of Wings for some pilgrimage-worthy painted wings, or Smitty Wings, or very, very hot wings, or double-dipped wings. The blue cheese is on us.

Discover America's Tastiest Drive

I want...

  • hot

  • saucy

  • classic

  • unusual

Elmo’s Bar &
Restaurant

Duff’s Famous Wings

Glen Park Tavern

Cole's

Anchor Bar

Lenox Grill

Gabriel’s Gate

Gene McCarthy’s

Blackthorn Restaurant
& Pub

Doc Sullivan’s

Bar-Bill Tavern

Mammoser’s Tavern & Restaurant

Nine-Eleven Tavern

O'Neill's Stadium Inn

Elmo’s Bar &
Restaurant

Double-Dipped

Elmo’s Bar & Restaurant is a no-frills bar located in a strip mall off a four-lane highway that serves up some of the most unique – and tasty – wings in Buffalo. Elmo’s has been honing its wing game since owner Adrian Meredith took over in the early 1990s, developing a from-scratch Cajun sauce that was unprecedented in Buffalo and heavily incorporating grilling into its process. Now, most wing orders are grilled, and nearly half are “double-dipped:” fried, tossed in sauce, grilled, doused in a different sauce, and served.

The result is a wing bursting with a combination of flavors unlike anywhere else on the trail. Over a half-dozen double-dip options are available; the “BBQ hot” is a fusion of tang and heat, while the “Cajun honey mustard” is both sweet and spicy, with the char-grilled smokiness rounding out the flavor profile. The simple interior of the bar features late 1990s Sabres jerseys, a tribute to the days when the team used to chow down here after practice.

Duff’s Famous Wings

Duff’s are everywhere – on the walls, the menus, the large white buckets served for discarded wings and even on apparel. “MEDIUM is HOT. MEDIUM HOT is VERY HOT. HOT is VERY, VERY HOT.” The adjusted flavor scale for Duff’s sauces even inspired a group of Saturday Night Live writers, who created an early 1990s sketch based on their Duff’s experience. You’ll appreciate SNL’s “Super Fire Hot Wings” online even more after dining at Duff’s.

Open since 1946, Duff’s added “Famous Wings” to its title after a glowing Buffalo News review in the 1980s. It has grown to include several area locations, including one President Obama visited in 2010. But the original Sheridan Drive location remains the star. Duff’s fries their wings once to seal in the juice, then again to make them crispy. It results in a wing high on the crispy, saucy and juicy spectrum.

Pro tip: Eat like a local and order a side of fries to dunk in your blue cheese and gravy.

Glen Park Tavern

Originally a stagecoach stop on the road between Buffalo and Rochester, the Glen Park Tavern has been an institution in the village of Williamsville since 1887. Some 130 years later, the tavern – under the ownership of the Grenauer family since the late 1990s – remains a beloved local landmark. The original wooden bar, wood-hewn ceiling and photos of 19th-century Williamsville on the walls remind customers of the tavern’s rich history.

The tavern prides itself on quality ingredients, including jumbo wings that are some of the largest on the trail, and an especially creamy blue cheese dressing made from scratch. Nearly two-thirds of the staff at the tavern have worked there for over 20 years and meet regularly to review the menu and food, which recently spurred the development of a secret ingredient that helps their sauce stick to the wing. Locals swear by the Glen Park’s Sicilian wing, which is covered in Parmesan cheese, garlic, basil and oregano.

Cole's

Classic Wings

If only the walls at Cole’s could talk. Memorabilia collected through the years covers nearly every square inch of this 84-year-old staple of the Elmwood Village. A rowing boat from the 1960 Summer Olympics, a series of carousel horses from a local Merry-Go-Round and dozens of college pennants all hang from the ceiling of this storied pub. Cole’s honors its rich past while also keeping up on current trends, serving more than three dozen local, domestic and European microbrews on tap. That eye toward the future extends to its wing game too. Sure, there’s the classic varieties like hot, medium and mild that the Shatzel family first started serving after taking over the pub in 1972. But the pub also recently debuted a hot honey cajun wing that’s both fried and grilled. And Cole’s is one of the only spots on the trail where you can pair five wings with a beef on weck sandwich, a uniquely Buffalo combo.

Anchor Bar

Making a pilgrimage to the birthplace of the chicken wing? Do yourself a favor: Instead of entering the Anchor Bar from the parking lot, walk around the corner to the Main Street entrance, stop at the original wooden bar, and pause.

This very spot changed the course of American food history in 1964, when the hungry friends of Dominic Bellissimo, who was tending bar at the time, arrived looking for a late-night snack. Dominic’s mother – owner Teressa Bellissimo – took the chicken wings originally intended for a soup, fried them, tossed them in hot sauce and served them.

The Anchor Bar subsequently became a mecca for wing lovers, evidenced by over 500 license plates hanging on the barroom walls from every state, Canadian provinces and most of Western Europe.

With roots dating back to 1935, the Anchor Bar has grown to a dozen locations and sells its signature sauce in almost 3,000 supermarkets and as far away as Kyoto, Japan. While the Main Street location serves several varieties of wings, it’s the medium that are the closest interpretation to Teressa’s
original recipe from all those years ago.

Lenox Grill

Upon entering the Lenox Grill, you might expect to see Ted Danson tending bar. The pub, set several feet below ground and clad in dark wood – bears a striking resemblance to the set of Cheers, the kind of place “where everybody knows your name” or will soon enough.

The Lenox Grill is set within Buffalo’s oldest continuously operating hotel, which dates to the turn of the 20th century and has housed an impressive roster of guests including Duke Ellington, Henry Fonda, Harry Belafonte and a young F. Scott Fitzgerald. The pub, opened more recently, has distinguished itself with an eye-popping beer list of over 550 bottled varieties and a kitchen open later than anywhere else on the trail (3 a.m. on weekends, with a 4 a.m. bar closing time). Its wings have gained local acclaim thanks to enterprising chef Michael Strom, who introduces a new weekly wing special to the bar, from peanut butter-and-jelly to s’mores. Other noteworthy flavor options include the BBQ honey Sriracha and Korean BBQ.

Gabriel’s Gate

The old saying of “If it ain’t broke, don’t fix it” would certainly apply at Gabriel’s Gate. This staple of Buffalo’s Allentown neighborhood for the last half-century has kept its wings consistent throughout the years – a touch crispy, with a splash of Frank’s Red Hot. Gabriel’s Gate is the standard for a classic wing done right.

Gabriel’s Gate – formerly a brick row house constructed in 1864 that once served as an antique shop – is teeming with character, from the tin ceilings and saloon-style chandelier to the hardwood floors, wooden booths and two wood-burning fireplaces. A series of mounted animal heads stare down customers from the high ceiling bar. Its long and narrow interior opens to a back patio that has a running fountain in the summer.

Gabriel’s is the kind of pub you could only find in Allentown – one of Buffalo’s oldest neighborhoods and the city’s creative quarter filled with historic architecture, public art and a host of galleries, bars, nightclubs and restaurants.

Gene McCarthy’s

McCarthy’s Style

In the shadow of Buffalo’s towering grain silos sits Gene McCarthy’s pub, an icon of the city’s Old First Ward since 1964. Grain scoopers who lived in the neighborhood and worked in the silos whet their whistles at Gene’s after a long day’s work. The pub’s interior décor – shamrocks painted on the ceiling, a Fighting Irish banner and a portrait of John F. Kennedy hang from the walls and reflect the Ward’s rich Irish heritage. As rock climbers, kayakers and artists reinvigorate the nearby grain silos, Gene’s has added to its traditional appeal with a recently installed brewery next door that serves a dozen craft beers.

Gene’s also delivers a delicious twist on the Buffalo wing by taking its partnership with blue cheese to a whole new level. The McCarthy’s-style wing features a sauce that combines blue cheese with hot and BBQ flavors. It’s topped with crumbly blue cheese and served with a side of blue cheese. At Gene’s, when they say #NeverRanch, they mean it.

Blackthorn Restaurant
& Pub

South Buffalo Style

The Gaelic sign greeting customers walking into the Blackthorn Restaurant & Pub says it all – “Cead Mile Failte” or “a hundred thousand welcomes.” Irish heritage, warmth, wit and hospitality abound in this Seneca Street establishment, from the Celtic music to portions of the bar imported from the Old Sod.

The Blackthorn has a menu filled with Irish fare, comfort foods and the “South Buffalo Wing,” a delicious interpretation of a standard wing with some extra spices and flavor served with housemade blue cheese. But the best-kept secret of the Blackthorn lies upstairs, in the backroom home of the storied Blackthorn Club, which has been around for over 100 years. The late Tim Russert – proud son of Buffalo and moderator of NBC’s Meet the Press – loved the pub and was slated to join the club’s ranks until his unexpected death in 2008. His presence looms large in a series of photos in the clubroom, along with pictures of St. Patrick’s Day parades and other events from the club’s storied history.

Doc Sullivan’s

Smitty Style

Along Abbott Road in South Buffalo, the “Smitty wing” rules the roost. Doc Sullivan’s Pub serves this born-in-the-neighborhood take on the wing, which mixes a half-dozen spices into a traditional hot sauce. “Smitty” is a nod to the pub’s previous name and the Smith family who ran it; the secret recipe has been passed down through generations of ownership for the last 40 years. “Smitty” hot, medium and mild replace the typical flavor scale found at most restaurants. The result is a perfectly crispy, saucy wing with a full-bodied flavor.

Another recent addition to Doc Sullivan’s menu is the beef on weck wing, a fusion of two of Buffalo’s most popular foods. Covered in horseradish aioli, salt and caraway seeds, these wings are a delicious new take on a Buffalo classic. Lots of natural light, a central wooden bar and photos of historic Buffalo on the walls make Doc Sullivan’s a comfortable neighborhood pub to stop in – and keep returning to.

Bar-Bill Tavern

Painted Wings

It’s no wonder Bar-Bill Tavern has its wings down to a science; the former owner was an aerospace engineer who perfected Buffalo’s signature food at this East Aurora institution. Staff methodically hand-brush each wing with housemade sauces like honey butter BBQ and spicy Asian. And every order features exactly five drums and five flats perfectly centered around a dipping bowl of blue cheese made in-house daily. Bar-Bill’s limited menu also includes one of Buffalo’s most renowned beef on weck sandwiches, hand carved on the spot. Bar-Bill, named after the tavern’s original owners, Barbara and Bill Korzelius, has gained a loyal following since opening decades ago inside a 150-year old building that formerly housed an ice cream parlor. A poster of Johnny Cash near the back of the long, narrow bar reminds patrons that the tavern is cash only. Bar-Bill added a second location in Clarence in 2020, giving Buffalo’s Northtowns a taste of the wings and weck Southtowns residents have sworn by for generations.

Mammoser’s Tavern & Restaurant

Some 12 years after the Buffalo-style wing’s inception, Phyllis Mammoser decided to try her own variation at Mammoser’s Tavern in Hamburg. The result was a wing unlike anywhere else in town. Phyllis loved spicy food, so she devised a homemade sauce that was a marked departure from the Frank’s Red Hot-based sauces Buffalonians were used to. She created Mammoser’s Original Wing Sauce, which is sold by the bottle at the restaurant and in local supermarkets. The sauce, which lists four different varieties of pepper in its top 10 ingredients, provides a slow burn and an extra kick of spiciness. Mammoser’s has a distinctive interior, with many of the original wooden features of the former 19th century stable still visible at the bar. Phyllis’ son Pete now runs the tavern, which has been in the Dimpfl family since 1948. Another noted distinction is that Mammoser’s uses no butter or margarine in its wing-making process, resulting in a drier wing that’s incredibly flavorful and juicy on the inside.

Nine-Eleven Tavern

Purist Wings

At the Nine-Eleven Tavern, there are only four options for wings – hot, medium, mild and plain – yet this workingman’s tavern tucked away on a quiet street in South Buffalo has carved out a reputation as one of the city’s best options for its signature food. Nine-Eleven’s presentation – carefully placed wings and celery revolve like clockwork around a bowl of blue cheese adorned with celery leaves – is without precedent locally. And the wings themselves are large, crispy, and saucy. Order the hot wings to try Nine-Eleven’s sauce – one of the most flavorful in town – in its purest form. It starts sweet and tangy, then builds towards a robust, fiery finish. Only one man made the wings here for nearly 40 years: the late owner Mark Gress, who opened the Nine-Eleven in 1981 and spent nearly every night in the kitchen until his death in 2020. Before he passed away, Gress turned over his closely-guarded wing recipe to his daughter, Paige, who now cooks the wings every night just like her father once did.

O'Neill's Stadium Inn

Chiavetta’s Wings

There are two kinds of days to visit O’Neill’s Stadium Inn: the eight Sundays of Buffalo Bills home games, and the other 357 days of the year. On those eight Sundays, tens of thousands of fans walk past the tavern within view of Highmark Stadium. O’Neill’s becomes pre-game party central, featuring shoulder-to shoulder fans wearing zubaz pants and Bills jackets, caps and sweatshirts. But those in the know head back to O’Neill’s on those other 357 days, when the limited gameday wing menu expands into nearly 60 sauce options, a list that begins on its printed menus and spills over onto its chalk-written walls. There’s the lemon pepper wing, which Buffalo Bills defensive tackle Ed Oliver frequently requests. And the Memphis dry rub wing, with a perfect level of crispiness and brown sugar crumbles sprinkled on top. And then there’s the Chiavetta’s wing. Chiavetta’s chicken marinade has been a Buffalo staple for more than 60 years, but is rare to find in restaurants as a wing option. The grilled Chiavetta’s wing at O’Neills offers the perfect smoky, vinegary taste that’s made the marinade such a beloved Buffalo flavor.

STILL HUNGRY? FEAST ON MORE OF BUFFALO'S CLASSIC FOOD

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#WINGBUF

Elmo’s Bar & <br>Restaurant

Elmo’s Bar &
Restaurant

2349 Millersport Hwy, Getzville, NY 14068

Elmo’s Bar & Restaurant is a no-frills bar located in a strip mall off a four-lane highway that serves up some of the most unique – and tasty – wings in Buffalo. Elmo’s has been honing its wing game since owner Adrian Meredith took over in the early 1990s, developing a from-scratch Cajun sauce that was unprecedented in Buffalo and heavily incorporating grilling into its process. Now, most wing orders are grilled, and nearly half are “double-dipped:” fried, tossed in sauce, grilled, doused in a different sauce, and served.

The result is a wing bursting with a combination of flavors unlike anywhere else on the trail. Over a half-dozen double-dip options are available; the “BBQ hot” is a fusion of tang and heat, while the “Cajun honey mustard” is both sweet and spicy, with the char-grilled smokiness rounding out the flavor profile. The simple interior of the bar features late 1990s Sabres jerseys, a tribute to the days when the team used to chow down here after practice.

Duff’s Famous Wings

Duff’s Famous Wings

3651 Sheridan Dr., Amherst, NY 14226

Duff’s are everywhere – on the walls, the menus, the large white buckets served for discarded wings and even on apparel. “MEDIUM is HOT. MEDIUM HOT is VERY HOT. HOT is VERY, VERY HOT.” The adjusted flavor scale for Duff’s sauces even inspired a group of Saturday Night Live writers, who created an early 1990s sketch based on their Duff’s experience. You’ll appreciate SNL’s “Super Fire Hot Wings” online even more after dining at Duff’s.

Open since 1946, Duff’s added “Famous Wings” to its title after a glowing Buffalo News review in the 1980s. It has grown to include several area locations, including one President Obama visited in 2010. But the original Sheridan Drive location remains the star. Duff’s fries their wings once to seal in the juice, then again to make them crispy. It results in a wing high on the crispy, saucy and juicy spectrum.

Pro tip: Eat like a local and order a side of fries to dunk in your blue cheese and gravy.

Glen Park Tavern

Glen Park Tavern

5507 Main St, Williamsville, NY 14221

Originally a stagecoach stop on the road between Buffalo and Rochester, the Glen Park Tavern has been an institution in the village of Williamsville since 1887. Some 130 years later, the tavern – under the ownership of the Grenauer family since the late 1990s – remains a beloved local landmark. The original wooden bar, wood-hewn ceiling and photos of 19th-century Williamsville on the walls remind customers of the tavern’s rich history.

The tavern prides itself on quality ingredients, including jumbo wings that are some of the largest on the trail, and an especially creamy blue cheese dressing made from scratch. Nearly two-thirds of the staff at the tavern have worked there for over 20 years and meet regularly to review the menu and food, which recently spurred the development of a secret ingredient that helps their sauce stick to the wing. Locals swear by the Glen Park’s Sicilian wing, which is covered in Parmesan cheese, garlic, basil and oregano.

Cole's

Cole's

1104 Elmwood Ave, Buffalo, NY 14222

If only the walls at Cole’s could talk. Memorabilia collected through the years covers nearly every square inch of this 84-year-old staple of the Elmwood Village. A rowing boat from the 1960 Summer Olympics, a series of carousel horses from a local Merry-Go-Round and dozens of college pennants all hang from the ceiling of this storied pub. Cole’s honors its rich past while also keeping up on current trends, serving more than three dozen local, domestic and European microbrews on tap. That eye toward the future extends to its wing game too. Sure, there’s the classic varieties like hot, medium and mild that the Shatzel family first started serving after taking over the pub in 1972. But the pub also recently debuted a hot honey cajun wing that’s both fried and grilled. And Cole’s is one of the only spots on the trail where you can pair five wings with a beef on weck sandwich, a uniquely Buffalo combo.

Anchor Bar

Anchor Bar

1047 Main St, Buffalo, NY 14209

Making a pilgrimage to the birthplace of the chicken wing? Do yourself a favor: Instead of entering the Anchor Bar from the parking lot, walk around the corner to the Main Street entrance, stop at the original wooden bar, and pause.

This very spot changed the course of American food history in 1964, when the hungry friends of Dominic Bellissimo, who was tending bar at the time, arrived looking for a late-night snack. Dominic’s mother – owner Teressa Bellissimo – took the chicken wings originally intended for a soup, fried them, tossed them in hot sauce and served them.

The Anchor Bar subsequently became a mecca for wing lovers, evidenced by over 500 license plates hanging on the barroom walls from every state, Canadian provinces and most of Western Europe.

With roots dating back to 1935, the Anchor Bar has grown to a dozen locations and sells its signature sauce in almost 3,000 supermarkets and as far away as Kyoto, Japan. While the Main Street location serves several varieties of wings, it’s the medium that are the closest interpretation to Teressa’s
original recipe from all those years ago.

Lenox Grill

Lenox Grill

140 North St, Buffalo, NY 14201

Upon entering the Lenox Grill, you might expect to see Ted Danson tending bar. The pub, set several feet below ground and clad in dark wood – bears a striking resemblance to the set of Cheers, the kind of place “where everybody knows your name” or will soon enough.

The Lenox Grill is set within Buffalo’s oldest continuously operating hotel, which dates to the turn of the 20th century and has housed an impressive roster of guests including Duke Ellington, Henry Fonda, Harry Belafonte and a young F. Scott Fitzgerald. The pub, opened more recently, has distinguished itself with an eye-popping beer list of over 550 bottled varieties and a kitchen open later than anywhere else on the trail (3 a.m. on weekends, with a 4 a.m. bar closing time). Its wings have gained local acclaim thanks to enterprising chef Michael Strom, who introduces a new weekly wing special to the bar, from peanut butter-and-jelly to s’mores. Other noteworthy flavor options include the BBQ honey Sriracha and Korean BBQ.

Gabriel’s Gate

Gabriel’s Gate

145 Allen St, Buffalo, NY 14201

The old saying of “If it ain’t broke, don’t fix it” would certainly apply at Gabriel’s Gate. This staple of Buffalo’s Allentown neighborhood for the last half-century has kept its wings consistent throughout the years – a touch crispy, with a splash of Frank’s Red Hot. Gabriel’s Gate is the standard for a classic wing done right.

Gabriel’s Gate – formerly a brick row house constructed in 1864 that once served as an antique shop – is teeming with character, from the tin ceilings and saloon-style chandelier to the hardwood floors, wooden booths and two wood-burning fireplaces. A series of mounted animal heads stare down customers from the high ceiling bar. Its long and narrow interior opens to a back patio that has a running fountain in the summer.

Gabriel’s is the kind of pub you could only find in Allentown – one of Buffalo’s oldest neighborhoods and the city’s creative quarter filled with historic architecture, public art and a host of galleries, bars, nightclubs and restaurants.

Gene McCarthy’s

Gene McCarthy’s

73 Hamburg St, Buffalo, NY 14204

In the shadow of Buffalo’s towering grain silos sits Gene McCarthy’s pub, an icon of the city’s Old First Ward since 1964. Grain scoopers who lived in the neighborhood and worked in the silos whet their whistles at Gene’s after a long day’s work. The pub’s interior décor – shamrocks painted on the ceiling, a Fighting Irish banner and a portrait of John F. Kennedy hang from the walls and reflect the Ward’s rich Irish heritage. As rock climbers, kayakers and artists reinvigorate the nearby grain silos, Gene’s has added to its traditional appeal with a recently installed brewery next door that serves a dozen craft beers.

Gene’s also delivers a delicious twist on the Buffalo wing by taking its partnership with blue cheese to a whole new level. The McCarthy’s-style wing features a sauce that combines blue cheese with hot and BBQ flavors. It’s topped with crumbly blue cheese and served with a side of blue cheese. At Gene’s, when they say #NeverRanch, they mean it.

Blackthorn Restaurant <br>& Pub

Blackthorn Restaurant
& Pub

2134 Seneca St, Buffalo, NY 14210

The Gaelic sign greeting customers walking into the Blackthorn Restaurant & Pub says it all – “Cead Mile Failte” or “a hundred thousand welcomes.” Irish heritage, warmth, wit and hospitality abound in this Seneca Street establishment, from the Celtic music to portions of the bar imported from the Old Sod.

The Blackthorn has a menu filled with Irish fare, comfort foods and the “South Buffalo Wing,” a delicious interpretation of a standard wing with some extra spices and flavor served with housemade blue cheese. But the best-kept secret of the Blackthorn lies upstairs, in the backroom home of the storied Blackthorn Club, which has been around for over 100 years. The late Tim Russert – proud son of Buffalo and moderator of NBC’s Meet the Press – loved the pub and was slated to join the club’s ranks until his unexpected death in 2008. His presence looms large in a series of photos in the clubroom, along with pictures of St. Patrick’s Day parades and other events from the club’s storied history.

Doc Sullivan’s

Doc Sullivan’s

474 Abbott Rd, Buffalo, NY 14220

Along Abbott Road in South Buffalo, the “Smitty wing” rules the roost. Doc Sullivan’s Pub serves this born-in-the-neighborhood take on the wing, which mixes a half-dozen spices into a traditional hot sauce. “Smitty” is a nod to the pub’s previous name and the Smith family who ran it; the secret recipe has been passed down through generations of ownership for the last 40 years. “Smitty” hot, medium and mild replace the typical flavor scale found at most restaurants. The result is a perfectly crispy, saucy wing with a full-bodied flavor.

Another recent addition to Doc Sullivan’s menu is the beef on weck wing, a fusion of two of Buffalo’s most popular foods. Covered in horseradish aioli, salt and caraway seeds, these wings are a delicious new take on a Buffalo classic. Lots of natural light, a central wooden bar and photos of historic Buffalo on the walls make Doc Sullivan’s a comfortable neighborhood pub to stop in – and keep returning to.

Bar-Bill Tavern

Bar-Bill Tavern

185 Main St, East Aurora, NY 14052

It’s no wonder Bar-Bill Tavern has its wings down to a science; the former owner was an aerospace engineer who perfected Buffalo’s signature food at this East Aurora institution. Staff methodically hand-brush each wing with housemade sauces like honey butter BBQ and spicy Asian. And every order features exactly five drums and five flats perfectly centered around a dipping bowl of blue cheese made in-house daily. Bar-Bill’s limited menu also includes one of Buffalo’s most renowned beef on weck sandwiches, hand carved on the spot. Bar-Bill, named after the tavern’s original owners, Barbara and Bill Korzelius, has gained a loyal following since opening decades ago inside a 150-year old building that formerly housed an ice cream parlor. A poster of Johnny Cash near the back of the long, narrow bar reminds patrons that the tavern is cash only. Bar-Bill added a second location in Clarence in 2020, giving Buffalo’s Northtowns a taste of the wings and weck Southtowns residents have sworn by for generations.

Mammoser’s Tavern & Restaurant

Mammoser’s Tavern & Restaurant

16 S Buffalo St, Hamburg, NY 14075

Some 12 years after the Buffalo-style wing’s inception, Phyllis Mammoser decided to try her own variation at Mammoser’s Tavern in Hamburg. The result was a wing unlike anywhere else in town. Phyllis loved spicy food, so she devised a homemade sauce that was a marked departure from the Frank’s Red Hot-based sauces Buffalonians were used to. She created Mammoser’s Original Wing Sauce, which is sold by the bottle at the restaurant and in local supermarkets. The sauce, which lists four different varieties of pepper in its top 10 ingredients, provides a slow burn and an extra kick of spiciness. Mammoser’s has a distinctive interior, with many of the original wooden features of the former 19th century stable still visible at the bar. Phyllis’ son Pete now runs the tavern, which has been in the Dimpfl family since 1948. Another noted distinction is that Mammoser’s uses no butter or margarine in its wing-making process, resulting in a drier wing that’s incredibly flavorful and juicy on the inside.

Nine-Eleven Tavern

Nine-Eleven Tavern

11 Bloomfield Ave, Buffalo, NY 14220

At the Nine-Eleven Tavern, there are only four options for wings – hot, medium, mild and plain – yet this workingman’s tavern tucked away on a quiet street in South Buffalo has carved out a reputation as one of the city’s best options for its signature food. Nine-Eleven’s presentation – carefully placed wings and celery revolve like clockwork around a bowl of blue cheese adorned with celery leaves – is without precedent locally. And the wings themselves are large, crispy, and saucy. Order the hot wings to try Nine-Eleven’s sauce – one of the most flavorful in town – in its purest form. It starts sweet and tangy, then builds towards a robust, fiery finish. Only one man made the wings here for nearly 40 years: the late owner Mark Gress, who opened the Nine-Eleven in 1981 and spent nearly every night in the kitchen until his death in 2020. Before he passed away, Gress turned over his closely-guarded wing recipe to his daughter, Paige, who now cooks the wings every night just like her father once did.

O'Neill's Stadium Inn

O'Neill's Stadium Inn

3864 Abbott Road, Orchard Park, NY

There are two kinds of days to visit O’Neill’s Stadium Inn: the eight Sundays of Buffalo Bills home games, and the other 357 days of the year. On those eight Sundays, tens of thousands of fans walk past the tavern within view of Highmark Stadium. O’Neill’s becomes pre-game party central, featuring shoulder-to shoulder fans wearing zubaz pants and Bills jackets, caps and sweatshirts. But those in the know head back to O’Neill’s on those other 357 days, when the limited gameday wing menu expands into nearly 60 sauce options, a list that begins on its printed menus and spills over onto its chalk-written walls. There’s the lemon pepper wing, which Buffalo Bills defensive tackle Ed Oliver frequently requests. And the Memphis dry rub wing, with a perfect level of crispiness and brown sugar crumbles sprinkled on top. And then there’s the Chiavetta’s wing. Chiavetta’s chicken marinade has been a Buffalo staple for more than 60 years, but is rare to find in restaurants as a wing option. The grilled Chiavetta’s wing at O’Neills offers the perfect smoky, vinegary taste that’s made the marinade such a beloved Buffalo flavor.

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